Please browse our in-service course offerings. Click on the + to read the course description. To check on availability and register, please visit the Course Registration page.


Accountability and Engagement: Working With People Who Have Perpetrated Violence

The families we serve are often challenged by multiple complex issues. Recent research shows that domestic violence, most often perpetrated by men, is one such issue that often coexists with child maltreatment, which may profoundly impact the ability of a family to protect and nurture their children. Domestic violence may also pose a threat to caseworkers and other professionals working with the family. Engaging with and holding the abuser accountable in these cases is extremely skillful work.

Caseworkers can best enhance well-being of children when they partner with the adult victim, hold the offender accountable, and collaborate with other community allies and resources—simple in concept but hard to do in this complicated situation.

Learners will practice the following skills in this one-day classroom learning experience:

  • Both engaging and holding the offending parent accountable for their abusive behavior
  • Avoiding revictimizing or blaming the adult victim
  • Determining what accountability really means
  • Focusing on fatherhood and parenting ideals to motivate behavior change
  • Eliciting the offending parent’s perspective
  • Staying focused on the offender’s behavior without escalating the situation
  • Examining our own values/feelings/attitudes about these complicated cases

ACEs: More Than a Score

Many of us have heard “What’s your ACE score?” or “That’s a high score,” but what does this really mean for families? This interactive one-day classroom course facilitated by Illuminate Colorado gives learners the foundation they need to recognize the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and how to strengthen protective factors in children to bolster resiliency and success.

Over the course of the day, learners will explore how to incorporate the knowledge of ACEs and their impacts on both mental and physical health and gain tips and techniques on how to increase protective factors in the lives of children and families. Learners will explore how to go beyond an ACE score to support children and families with a focus on building resiliency to counteract the negative impacts of ACEs.

Achieving Permanency Through Roundtables (PRT)

The premise is that we activate the necessity and possibility of achieving permanency for every child and youth by appreciating the concepts and values essential to successful participation in Permanency Roundtables.

This interactive one-day training prepares you for participation in permanency roundtables (PRTs). You will acquire a framework for understanding why permanency is necessary and possible for every child and youth. In addition to learning what a permanency roundtable is and who should participate, you will practice permanency-focused skills as they are applied through roundtables. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to

  • define permanency;
  • explain the importance of permanency in achieving positive outcomes for youth;
  • describe the purpose, roles, and phases of a permanency roundtable;
  • demonstrate the outcomes achieved through Permanency Roundtables;

  • experience the strategies for engaging youth and families in achieving permanency;
  • explain strategies for overcoming resistance to permanency with youth and families;

  • apply the tools and techniques to locate permanent connections for youth;
  • proceed through the necessary steps to prepare for Permanency Roundtables.

This course is open to all public child welfare staff and administrators, community partners, contract agencies, court officials, and community partners (including those working with mental health, domestic violence, or substance abuse). Any professional or organization embarking on the implementation of Permanency Roundtables should attend this course.

Activating the Three Brains of Trauma-Informed Practice

Trauma is a common experience for so many of the people whom we serve, and though safety is at the core of our work, it is the impact of trauma on children and families that speaks to our hearts. As caseworkers, we are called on to prevent abuse and neglect—and we also understand that traumatic events of the past can have effects that ripple far out into the future. In this dynamic learning experience, learners will do a deep dive to discover how to fully integrate trauma-informed practice into their daily work. In this course, learners will

  • share their knowledge and experience of trauma-informed practice with colleagues,
  • consider what works and what doesn’t when it comes to trauma-informed engagement,
  • explore the ways in which they personally manage and cope with traumatic
  • experiences, and
  • encounter the Three Brains of trauma and how to activate them with those who have experienced trauma.

Following this one-day classroom learning experience, learners will be both empowered and challenged to approach every interaction as an opportunity to use these critical skills and build resilience in children, youth, and families.

Adolescent Permanency

Permanency for every youth should include a permanent legal connection to a family, such as reuniting with birth parents, adoption, kinship care, or legal guardianship. However, when these options are less likely, caseworkers, foster parents, and GALs can help youth pursue physical or relational permanency. Caring adults can provide lifelong support that can help youth transition to adulthood, and these connection always have the potential to become a legal permanent option for the youth. In this one-day classroom course, you will develop a fuller understanding of permanency for youth in out-of-home care, and you’ll build a team approach to helping youth achieve lifelong connections.

Adolescents: The 411

This two-day hybrid model training will help you understand adolescents—and the reasons for the challenges they present in case work. In the online portion of the training, you’ll review adolescent development and substance use and abuse trends. Then you’ll bring two cases of your own to the classroom, which you’ll use throughout this portion of the training. Building on the online content, the classroom content will prepare you to

  • understand barriers to health development, including the impact of substance use, trauma, and family dynamics;
  • understand common behavioral health disorders and how they manifest with adolescents;
  • identify appropriate assessment techniques and strategies; and
  • develop case plans that are responsive to an adolescent’s needs.

Upon completion, you will have a solid foundation from which to address the developmental, familial, and behavioral health factors that influence case outcomes.

The Art and Heart of Facilitated Family Meetings

What principles and practices lie behind a successful facilitated family meeting? Come find out—and get some hands-on experience—in this two-day facilitation skills training.

The facilitated family meeting process seeks to harness the wisdom, ideas, and perspectives of the family and its supports. It also promotes trust and encourages critical thinking and creativity within the group. So a goal of this training is to expose you to facilitation techniques that change the culture of our communication with one another, with families, and about families. You’ll leave equipped with new approaches to successfully facilitating family meetings.

This course is most beneficial if you’ve already had experience with or a role in a formal family meeting process.

The Art of Managing Behavior

This two-day training is the third in a series of three trainings designed for case aides. You’ll engage in activities based on real cases. Through these activities, you will develop tools and practical interventions for working with children with behavioral disorders. You’ll acquire the knowledge and skills you’ll need in interactions with children and families in visitation centers, life skills programs, home-based service programs and parent education groups.

You’ll also identify and develop effective behavioral management strategies that you can teach to families.

Upon completion, you will

  • understand the symptoms, causes, associated problems, and treatment for major mental-health disorders that affect children in child welfare (ADHD, post-traumatic stress disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, bipolar disorder, and depression);
  • have developed behavior management strategies to teach and use with families in child welfare; and
  • know how to inexpensively create therapeutic games for children with behavioral disorders.

Assessing Patterns and Behaviors of Neglect

Did you know that approximately 70 percent of all accepted referrals from the child abuse and neglect hotline in Colorado are for neglect? When neglect escalates, positive outcomes for children and youth diminish. Because neglect is a constant state of grey that can be clouded by cultural differences, parenting practices, varying evidence of impact, and individual bias, thorough assessments with families are vital and require an enhanced set of casework skills.

In this 2-day course, using real case scenarios, learners will strengthen their ability to critically examine the history of families referred for neglect while assessing other risk factors, and learners will explore what they themselves bring to neglect assessments and how that affects a family’s experience. Learners will be more confident and prepared to ask difficult and thoughtful questions and piece together complex family dynamics, all while articulating and addressing concerns with families using anti-oppressive practices. Learners will leave with an in-depth neglect response resource guide tailored to their own communities—and enhanced solution-focused methods and skills to better understand how to support families to minimize the likelihood of increasingly neglectful patterns.

Beat the Odds: Promoting Resilience and Reducing Secondary Trauma

Child welfare staff are first responders; like police officers and firefighters, they respond to emergency situations with very little information and, by doing so, often put themselves in harm’s way. In addition to the very real physical risks involved with responding to a report of suspected child abuse or neglect, there are equally real psychological hazards involved with taking care of children and families who have experienced abuse, neglect, family and community violence, and other trauma. But child welfare staff get very little public recognition for the hard work they do. When the child welfare system is in the news, it is often for negative reasons, which serves to increase rather than mitigate the stress and pressure its staff work under.

Secondary traumatic stress (STS) refers to the experience of people who are exposed to others’ traumatic stories as part of their jobs and as a result develop their own traumatic symptoms and reactions. Child welfare professionals are particularly susceptible to STS because of the vulnerability of their clients, the unpredictable nature of their jobs, and their relative lack of physical and emotional protection.

This online, Zoom-based, interactive learning experience consists of a series of 24 one-hour training and discussion sessions designed to mitigate the impact of STS among child protective staff by increasing job satisfaction, resilience, optimism, self-care, and social support, and decreasing staff attrition, stress reactivity, and burnout.

In this skills-focused series, learners will use three prisms to approach their work:

  • Optimism—workers focus on the best possible outcomes and reframe challenging situations positively
  • Mastery—workers strengthen their ability to regulate negative emotions associated with child welfare work and promote self-care
  • Collaboration—workers engage in mutual support among caseworkers, supervisors, and families in the best interest of children/youth


In developing skills and behaviors that promote their own well-being, learners will help create a stronger, healthier work environment, positioning themselves—and their colleagues—for optimal child welfare practice.

The Birds, the Bees, and the Stork

Talking about sexual development and sexuality doesn’t have to be awkward or difficult. In this interactive one-day classroom course facilitated by Illuminate Colorado, learners will gain an increased understanding of healthy sexual development in children and youth. Through activities and discussion, learners will be able to identify developmentally expected behaviors and distinguish those from concerning behaviors.

As part of the course, learners will explore how to do the following:

  • Create and promote healthy boundaries and structures
  • Talk about sexuality with various audiences, including children, youth, and caregivers
  • Make informed decisions to promote healthy sexual development and prevent concerning behaviors

Note: This course will focus on recognizing healthy sexual development and gaining skills on how to communicate with various audiences about boundaries and healthy sexuality. If you’re looking for a course on children or youth displaying problematic sexual behaviors, you may be better served by another Illuminate Colorado course: Supporting Families When Children and Youth Display Problematic Sexual Behaviors.

Bonding When Broken: Maintaining Parenting Relationships

We all know that visits between caregivers and their children after removal are crucial to healthy child development and attachment. Caregivers may lose parenting momentum and all family members alike may experience a profound loss of connection during this difficult time. But in a system that is often overwhelmed with the workload, how do we prioritize parenting time—in a meaningful way that truly supports and strengthens the critical bond between caregivers and their children and addresses the reasons the children are out of their care?

Parenting time plans (often called visitation plans) are not standardized in Colorado, yet they have an incredible impact on family outcomes. This course has you getting creative about parenting time and making that time purposeful for everyone. Whether you come from a county with a parenting time provider agency or not, this course clarifies best practices and arms you with tools to improve parenting time for children, their caregivers, and the system. Using problem-based learning, you’ll discuss how to determine what makes a good parenting time plan, how much time is needed, what level of supervision is required, and where parenting time should happen. You’ll be challenged to consider what preparation and support caregivers and children/youth need in order to connect during separation AND reunification. When you leave the classroom, you’ll be able to determine purposeful parenting time plans that are supportive of permanency and reunification for children and youth and their families.

Brain Essentials

A child’s environment, whether wonderfully nurturing or replete with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), shapes the sequential development of the brain. Children need stable and supportive relationships with their caregivers. They must be nurtured in order to thrive. Yet even the best-intended practices of courts and agencies are not always in sync with cutting-edge research.

Learners will begin with a pre-training exploration of how the brain works and how child welfare practices sometimes do not align with what we know helps children and families. The in-class experience features a safe and fun learning milieu in which you’ll hear about, experience, reflect on, and experiment with the exponential growth in what we know about the most important part of our bodies: our brain.

With insight on how our brains work, you will better understand why parents may make poor decisions, why children who have experienced trauma act as they do, and why child welfare workers and other stakeholders sometimes arrive at conclusions influenced by improper biases.

You’ll have a chance to develop your own toolbox to mitigate the effect of unwelcome biases in your decision-making, leading to more just decisions. The goal of this course is to align proven practices with current brain research.

Bridge to Health Care: Accessing Services for Children and Youth (Web-Based Training)

Child welfare–involved children and youth often have significant health care needs. Fortunately, Health First Colorado and the Child Mental Health Treatment Act (CMHTA) offer a wide range of services to meet these needs. In order to best serve children and youth in Colorado, it is vital for child welfare professionals to build and strengthen the bridge between the services of child welfare and those of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing and the Office of Behavioral Health.

This interactive learning experience provides child welfare professionals with the tools to help families understand how to access quality and consistent health care for children and youth. Learners will explore the benefits and services of both Health First Colorado and the CMHTA as well as their role in optimizing these resources to reduce the use of Core Services Program dollars.

This self-paced Web-based training will help learners do the following:

  • understand the benefits, services, and eligibility requirements, including waivers, of Health First Colorado and the purpose of its various health plans and providers
  • understand the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment program (EPSDT) and medical necessity
  • summarize the purpose of the Healthy Communities program and the role of family health coordinators
  • recognize the importance of mental health screening and treatment
  • explain how Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) work within Health First Colorado
  • describe how the CMHTA helps families meet the mental health needs of their children and youth without child welfare involvement
  • reflect on their role in connecting the families they serve with agencies that provide health care coverage to children and families

Building Safety When Parents Use Substances

This interactive one-day classroom course gives you the foundation you will need in order to identify when substance use is impacting child safety. You’ll also learn how to build a consistent response when working with families impacted by substance use.

A best-practice response is contingent upon familiarity with the dynamics of substance use, abuse, and addiction. So we’ll familiarize you with those dynamics and give you the opportunity to consider the impacts of substance use on child welfare practice—from screening to assessment to an ongoing case. You’ll leave informed and equipped to enhance safety-building practices with families when substance use is a factor.

Note: This course is specifically designed for new caseworkers and those who have less than two years’ experience. If you’re a more experienced caseworker or supervisor, you may be better served by another Illuminate Colorado course: Enhancing Practice With Families Impacted by Substance Use.

Building Safety With Families Impacted by Domestic Violence

This interactive one-day training focuses on bringing the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Domestic Violence Practice Guide for Child Protective Services(CPS)to life in casework practice. It will provide you with a foundation for identifying when domestic violence is affecting child safety and for constructing a consistent, child-centered, family-focused response when you are working with a family affected by domestic violence.

Because a best-practice response is contingent upon caseworkers’ familiarity with the dynamics of domestic violence, this training will familiarize you with those dynamics and provide guidelines for working with families from screening to assessment to an ongoing case. It will also address the need for strong coordination with community partners and look at the ways in which those partners can best support your work. You will have the opportunity to practice the skills outlined in the CDHS Domestic Violence Practice Guide for Child Protective Services so that you can apply those skills with confidence in the field.

Prior to the classroom training, you will be asked to complete the web-based training (WBT) portion of this course. The web-based portion will include a review of the CDHS Domestic Violence Practice Guide for Child Protective Services, a brief worksheet, and a pre-test. The goal of the pre-classroom work is to prepare your for the skills-based classroom discussions and activities.

Building Safety With Families Impacted by Mental Illness

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one in four adults—approximately 61.5 million Americans—experiences mental illness in a given year, with 1 in 17 experiencing a serious mental illness. Given these statistics, it is highly probable that children and youth who become involved in the child welfare system will have a caregiver who is or has experienced a mental illness.

This course will prepare you to assess the behavior of caregivers with a mental illness to determine if the behavior inhibits their ability to provide for the well-being needs of children and youth in their care. The course will also encourage you to consider other factors related to the child, youth, other family members, and the community. The goal is always to facilitate a comprehensive understanding, assessment, and evaluation that leads to informed planning and decision making. To that end, you will engage in case-based scenarios and activities that focus on recognizing behaviors and factors influenced by mental illness, and the level of impact the behaviors may have on the child or youth.

To assist you in building your knowledge, you will do some exploring of resources on the internet during this class. Please plan to bring your laptop, tablet, or Smartphone to access the internet.

Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: Adolescent Development (Web Based Training)

This interactive, self-guided online course is designed to help child welfare professionals and foster, kinship, and adoptive parents understand the impact of trauma on the development of adolescents who have experienced child abuse and neglect. This is an optional course for learners who are completing the Fundamentals of Colorado Child Welfare Casework Practicecourse series. 
 
Your own experiences in caring for and working with children and youth will be a resource during this training. We’ll also have videos that provide examples of typical and atypical development, interactive activities, and written resources you can access to explore the impact of abuse and neglect. Throughout the training, you will be asked to consider the impact that abuse and neglect might have on the children and youth you are caring for and working with, and how this impact might manifest in a child or youth’s behavior.
 
The Adolescent Development and the Effects of Traumacourse is one course in a series of four online courses related to child development and the effects of trauma. This course focuses specifically on adolescents and can only be completed once Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: The Essentialsis completed.

The other courses in the series are:

  • Infant and Toddler Development and the Effects of Trauma
  • School Age Child Development and the Effects of Trauma

In this training you will explore four developmental domains:

  • physical,
  • cognitive,
  • social-emotional, and
  • sexual.

Within each domain, we’ll explore the following topics:

  • typical developmental milestones for adolescents,
  • indicators that development has been affected or disrupted by trauma,
  • guidelines for what caregivers and caseworkers can do when developmental concerns have been identified,
  • opportunities for caregivers and caseworkers to practice identifying atypical development, and
  • guidance for caregivers and caseworkers on how best to support adolescents affected by trauma.

Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: Infant and Toddler Development (Web-Based Training)

This interactive, self-guided online course is designed to help child welfare professionals and foster, kinship, and adoptive parents understand the impact of trauma on the development of infants and toddlers who have experienced child abuse and neglect. This is an optional course for learners who are completing the Fundamentals of Colorado Child Welfare Casework Practicecourse series.

Your own experiences in caring for and working with children and youth will be a resource during this training. We’ll also have videos that provide examples of typical and atypical development, interactive activities, and written resources you can access to explore the impact of abuse and neglect. Throughout the training, you will be asked to consider the impact that abuse and neglect might have on the children and youth you are caring for and working with, and how this impact might manifest in a child or youth’s behavior.

The Infant and Toddler Development and the Effects of Traumacourse is one course in a series of four online courses related to child development and the effects of trauma. This course focuses specifically on infants and toddlers and can only be completed once Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: The Essentialsis completed.

The other courses in the series are:

  • School Age Child Development and the Effects of Trauma
  • Adolescent Development and the Effects of Trauma

In this training you will explore four developmental domains:

  • physical,
  • cognitive,
  • social-emotional, and
  • sexual.

Within each domain, we’ll explore the following topics:

  • typical developmental milestones for school age children,
  • indicators that development has been affected or disrupted by trauma,
  • guidelines for what caregivers and caseworkers can do when developmental concerns have been identified,
  • opportunities for caregivers and caseworkers to practice identifying atypical development, and
  • guidance for caregivers and caseworkers on how best to support school age children affected by trauma.

Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: School Age Child Development (Web-Based Training)

This interactive, self-guided online course is designed to help child welfare professionals and foster, kinship, and adoptive parents understand the impact of trauma on the development of school age children who have experienced child abuse and neglect. This is an optional course for learners who are completing the Fundamentals of Colorado Child Welfare Casework Practicecourse series.

Your own experiences in caring for and working with children and youth will be a resource during this training. We'll also have videos that provide examples of typical and atypical development, interactive activities, and written resources you can access to explore the impact of abuse and neglect. Throughout the training, you will be asked to consider the impact that abuse and neglect might have on the children and youth you are caring for and working with, and how this impact might manifest in a child or youth's behavior.

The School Age Child Development and the Effects of Traumacourse is one course in a series of four online courses related to child development and the effects of trauma. This course focuses specifically on school age children and can only be completed once Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: The Essentialsis completed.

The other courses in the series are:

  • Infant and Toddler Development and the Effects of Trauma
  • Adolescent Development and the Effects of Trauma

In this training you will explore four developmental domains:

  • physical,
  • cognitive,
  • social-emotional, and
  • sexual.

Within each domain, we'll explore the following topics:

  • typical developmental milestones for school age children,
  • indicators that development has been affected or disrupted by trauma,
  • guidelines for what caregivers and caseworkers can do when developmental concerns have been identified,
  • opportunities for caregivers and caseworkers to practice identifying atypical development, and
  • guidance for caregivers and caseworkers on how best to support school age children affected by trauma.

Child Development and the Effects of Trauma: The Essentials (Web-Based Training)

This interactive, self-guided online course is designed to help child welfare professionals and foster, kinship, and adoptive parents understand the impact of trauma on the development of children and youth who have experienced child abuse and neglect. This is an optional course for learners who are completing the Fundamentals of Colorado Child Welfare Casework Practicecourse series.
 
The Essentials course is one course in a series of four online courses related to child development and the effects of trauma. This course is designed to provide a foundational understanding of child development and the effects of trauma and is a prerequisite for the other courses in the series:

  • Infant and Toddler Development and the Effects of Trauma
  • School Age Child Development and the Effects of Trauma
  • Adolescent Development and the Effects of Trauma

Your own experiences in caring for and working with children and youth will be a resource during this training. We’ll also have videos that provide examples of typical and atypical development, interactive activities, and written resources you can access to explore the impact of abuse and neglect. Throughout the training, you will be asked to consider the impact that abuse and neglect might have on the children and youth you are caring for and working with, and how this impact might manifest in a child or youth’s behavior.

Child Welfare Response to Child & Youth Sex Trafficking: Module 1 for Caseworkers

Module 1 is the first in a series of training modules designed for child welfare professionals to build your capacity to identify and serve children and youth who have been sexually trafficked. This course is designed to provide a foundational understanding of sex trafficking and is a prerequisite for two of the other courses in the series:

  • Child Welfare Response to Child & Youth Sex Trafficking: Module 2 for Supervisors
  • Child Welfare Response to Child & Youth Sex Trafficking: Module 3 for Administrators and Managers

In addition, there is a fourth course in the series, which is for caregivers.

Module 1 is an interactive two-day course designed for child welfare staff who could potentially engage with child/youth victims of sex trafficking. In this course, you will learn about:

  • characteristics of child/youth victims
  • risk factors
  • the needs of child/youth victims
  • strategies for trauma-informed, gender-specific, and culturally responsive approaches.

You will also cover collaboration and partnership across agencies and providers. Through this training, you will be able to understand and describe effective identification, documentation, reporting, and service delivery for children and youth involved with the child welfare agency who are victims of, or at risk of, sex trafficking.

Confidentiality Bootcamp

Confused about what records, reports, and information you can share? Who gets access and who doesn’t? What happens if a mistake is made? This one-day training demystifies the law.

Upon completion, you will be equipped

  • to confidently respond to information requests,
  • to obtain consent forms and releases of information that are legally compliant, and
  • to navigate the labyrinth of federal and state privacy laws. 


This hybrid course combines a short, web-based pre-training with live, interactive classroom instruction. Upon completion, you will be prepared to effectively assess cases without the stress and confusion around confidentiality.

Cracking the Medical Code: A Collaborative Response to Medical Aspects of Child Maltreatment

Child maltreatment occurs along a spectrum, and unfortunately there are instances when the maltreatment rises to the level where medical intervention is required. Generally, these can be some of the most egregious cases of child abuse, thus making it critical that child welfare practitioners respond effectively and expeditiously. Cracking the Medical Code is a hybrid learning experience in which learners will engage in both Web-based and classroom experiences that increase their awareness of medical aspects of child maltreatment and get learners to understand and critically think about questions to ask to support a comprehensive child welfare assessment. Learners will be introduced to common injuries, conditions, and medical concepts central to their role. At the conclusion of this learning experience, learners will be able to do the following:

  • Recognize the types of injuries or conditions that are consistent with child abuse
  • Identify behaviors a child or youth may exhibit in connection with a specific medical condition resulting from child abuse
  • Identify risk factors associated with acute or chronic medical conditions resulting from physical abuse or neglect
  • Demonstrate an understanding of when and how to intervene on behalf of a child or youth that has been abused
  • Collaborate with medical providers by identifying information to gather and questions to ask to complete a comprehensive child welfare assessment

Please note that the 3 prerequisite WBTs must be completed before the pre-classroom WBT and before the classroom session.

Collaborative Community Partnerships

Whether you are a child welfare caseworker, a supervisor, or one of our community partners, this interactive one-day course is designed for you. It will deepen your understanding of the need for partnership across disciplines and equip you with strategies for making that happen.

Collaboration in the human services can be challenging. That’s because the sources of potential conflict are multiple and complex. Each part of the system has its own language, motivations, legal parameters, and unique perspectives. Conflicts among partners can occur for many reasons, including misunderstandings about roles, assumptions about facts or values, miscommunication, personality disagreements, competing professional models, and limited resources.

This course will leverage your own experiences in working with other professionals on behalf of children, youth, and families. You’ll watch videos, participate in interactive activities, consider case studies, and acquire written resources that offer tools and strategies for improving collaboration and managing conflict. You’ll leave with the following knowledge, skills, and abilities:

  • strategies for resolving conflict and promoting collaboration;
  • an understanding of the benefits of an interdisciplinary or interagency approach;
  • an understanding of potential system barriers to collaboration;
  • the ability to collaborate with practitioners from other agencies and disciplines in a team approach to family assessment, case planning, and service delivery.

Only by developing a shared perspective can we build a high-quality service delivery system that meets the complex needs of children, youth, and families by offering a coordinated array of services and support. A truly collaborative partnership is a foundation for shared responsibility in the promotion of permanency, safety, and well-being.

Required Pre-Classroom Work

Prior to the classroom training, you will receive by email a “Difficult Conversations Preparation Worksheet” that you will need to complete and bring with you to training. This is a confidential worksheet focused on a past, current, or potential professional conflict. You will use your completed worksheet to apply new skills and tools learned in the classroom.

Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessment Tools: Refresher (Web-Based Training)

Revised Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessment Tools are about to “go live” throughout the state. These updated tools are the result of extensive field testing, reviews by the Administrative Review Division and the Division of Child Welfare, and county feedback and recommendations.

How can you prepare for this rollout? If you completed the "Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessments Training for Caseworkers" or "Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessments Training for Supervisors" in 2014 or 2015, we have good news! You don’t need to redo the training. This self-paced, web-based refresher training, developed exclusively for you, will

  • summarize the field test process that was used to develop the new Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessment Tools and Instructions;
  • describe what has changed within the Colorado Family Safety and Risk Assessment Tools and Instructions since you took the course; and
  • explain the cohort implementation process by which the new tools will be “rolled out” statewide.

To further facilitate the transition, CDHS Division of Child Welfare staff will be providing onsite technical assistance to you and your county as you “go live” with the new tools and instructions. Be sure to make note of any questions you have for CDHS staff as you complete this web-based refresher training.

Connecting Families for Success

Lifelong connections are essential in supporting youth in their quest for well-being and creating permanence. This interactive one-day course will help you to identify ways to create those connections for children and youth in care. You’ll learn to use your sleuthing skills to think of and locate creative connections, and you’ll have opportunities to practice your engagement skills as you talk to “children/youth,” “families,” and “support systems” about the importance of these connections.

Upon completion of the course, you will

  • have increased awareness and motivation to find family connections in your practice with children, youth, and families;
  • understand the relevance of family search and engagement;
  • be able to apply strategies for talking with children, youth, and families about maintaining connections and finding families;
  • be able to assess relevant permanency options with children and youth; and
  • be able to utilize websites, search engines, and databases to locate connections.

Come explore ways to improve connections for children and youth and share your successes with others trying to make a difference.

Consequences of Maltreatment for Child Development

This interactive, classroom-based course will help you understand the impact of trauma on the development of children and youth who have experienced child abuse and neglect.

Trauma and post-trauma adversities can profoundly influence children’s acquisition of developmental competencies and their capacity to reach important developmental milestones in domains such as cognitive functioning, emotional regulation, and interpersonal relationships. Your own experiences in caring for and working with children and youth will be a resource during this training; you will be asked to consider the impact that abuse and neglect might have on the children and youth you are caring for and working with, and how this impact might manifest in a child or youth’s behavior. You will also be introduced to videos, interactive activities, case studies, and written resources that you can access to explore the impact of abuse, neglect, and other forms of trauma.

And, most importantly, you will explore the guidelines and strategies that caregivers, caseworkers, therapists, and the entire child welfare system can use when trauma and its developmental consequences have been identified. Understanding these guidelines and strategies will allow us all to think critically about our decision making at critical points in a case.

To create safety, permanency, and well-being for children and youth, it is necessary for child welfare to be trauma-informed as a system. For that reason, we strongly encourage you to register for this course together with members of your county’s multidisciplinary team.

Considerations for Engaging the Non-Offending Parent

When it comes to child sexual abuse (CSA), having a supportive parent is one of the most important factors in a child’s recovery. In order to help facilitate recovery, it is important to understand the dynamics and impact of CSA on the child victim and the non-offending parent, along with the needs of the non-offending parent, who is often considered a secondary victim to the abuse. This two-day course will explore our personal reactions and attitudes surrounding the role of the non-offending parent, as well as approaches and skills that enable caseworkers to effectively engage with non-offending parents in the initial stages after disclosure. Caseworkers will leave with greater insight about the needs and strengths of the non-offending parent, as well as the ability to translate this understanding in their approach to engagement.

Creating Healing Attachments for Children

This one-day course, designed both for caseworkers and for foster and kinship parents, highlights the needs of children and youth in out-of-home care around the critical area of attachment. Through collaborative discussions and interactions, you’ll leverage your knowledge and experiences while also deepening your understanding of the risk factors for attachment difficulties. The facilitator will engage you in considering the impact maltreatment can have on attachment and in exploring ways of supporting children and youth in out-of-home care through healing attachment experiences and care. You’ll also have opportunities to practice assessing for and documenting attachment.

Credit Education for Youth in Foster Care

This training will provide agency staff, volunteers, and other relevant parties with information and resources on how to teach youth about credit beyond just addressing inaccurate information. Learners will explore how to convey credit education to youth, including why credit is important to financial independence, the benefits of having good credit, and basic strategies for building and sustaining good credit as youth emerge into independent adulthood.

Credit Health and Remediation for Youth in Foster Care (County Audience)

This one-day classroom course will teach county staff how to impart credit education to youth and engage in credit remediation. In the first section of this course, learners will explore how to impart credit education to youth, including why credit is important to financial independence, the benefits of having good credit, and basic strategies for building and sustaining good credit as youth emerge into independent adulthood.

In the afternoon section of this course, learners will review the detailed steps of how to review a credit report for errors, dispute inaccuracies, and address identity theft. This training is designed to fulfill the responsibility of child welfare agency staff to ensure that youth age 14 and older who are in foster care receive a copy of their credit report and assistance with resolving any inaccuracies found on the report.

If you’re a caseworker, foster, kinship, or adoptive parent, CASA, or someone who provides credit education to youth, please see Credit Health and Remediation for Youth in Foster Care (General Audience).

Credit Health and Remediation for Youth in Foster Care (General Audience)

This classroom session will teach learners how to impart credit education to youth, including why credit is important to financial independence, the benefits of having good credit, and basic strategies for building and sustaining good credit as youth emerge into independent adulthood.

If you’re a county professional responsible for credit remediation for youth, please see Credit Health and Remediation for Youth in Foster Care (County Audience).

Credit Remediation for Youth in Foster Care

This training is intended to meet the requirements of the Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act of 2011 to review credit reports for all youth in foster care who are 14 and older and provide assistance with resolving any inaccuracies found on the report. Learners will explore the detailed steps of how to review a credit report for errors, dispute inaccuracies, and address identity theft.

Crucial Skills for Interviewing

Inquire and engage and explore—oh my!

The ability to connect with children, youth, and families in a manner that encourages genuine sharing is crucial to your successful child welfare practice. How you obtain information profoundly affects cocreating successful outcomes with families.

In this three-part course, you’ll develop your interviewing techniques and take your aptitude for facilitating authentic engagement with families to the next level. Building directly on your practice simulation experience from the caseworker Fundamentals series, this course will enhance your self-awareness and grow your ability to build trust and relationships with children, youth, and families.

This course contains three essential parts, completed over the course of a few weeks:

Part 1: Web-Based Training: Interview, Shadow, and Self-Assess (2.5 hours)
Using a quick Web-based training to guide you, you’ll coordinate a time for your supervisor to shadow you as you complete an interview with a family. Afterward, through meaningful dialogue and an assessment process, you and your supervisor will reflect on the interview and then identify skills for you to focus on developing in the classroom.

Part 2: Web-Based Training: Foundational Information (2 hours)
Next, you’ll complete the second Web-based training in this series. It provides foundational information essential for successful in-classroom practice and course completion.

Part 3: Classroom Session (3 days, 19.5 hours)
Using the goals cocreated by you and your supervisor during Part 1 and building on the Web-based training material from Part 2, you’ll continue to develop your interviewing skills with the guidance of an experienced facilitator. You’ll conclude the classroom session with an interview do-over using your enhanced knowledge and skills.

Your supervisor gets training hours too!Upon your successful completion of this course, your supervisor is eligible to receive training hours for their contribution to your success. Your supervisor will receive a certificate of completion, which they can submit online through the CWTS Training Log to receive training hours.

Come to CSI ready to delve into maximizing family interviews. You’ll leave with greater insight and the ability to integrate multiple interviewing techniques into your daily casework practice.

Course Timeline:

  • 4+ Weeks Prior to Class: Register. Both Part 1 and Part 2 WBTs are ready for you to begin.
  • 3 Weeks Prior to Class: Complete Part 1 WBT and its associated activities. Part 1’s final activity must be emailed to the instructor.
  • 1 Week Prior to Class: Complete Part 2 WBT and its associated activities.
  • The Week of Class: Attend the Part 3 classroom portion. Come prepared with identified activities from the previous Part 1 and 2 WBTs.

IMPORTANT: Your success in this course is dependent on your supervisor’s commitment and timely support in observing a home visit and completing your self-assessment with you. You must discuss these requirements with your supervisor and get their agreement to support you throughout this course before you register.

Data-Informed Supervision

Knowledge is power! This one-day course will explore how to access and utilize various data sources (ROM, CFSR, AFCARS, NCANDS) so that you can supervise to best-practice outcomes for children, youth, and families. Using your team’s county-specific data, you will drill down to the story behind the numbers to identify trends and patterns, and uncover mechanisms to sustain positive results, improve necessary outcomes, and motivate your team.

You are asked to bring a tablet or laptop to this course to actively participate. Learners are also expected to have current ROM login information and a basic understanding of how to navigate to and within data from ROM, AFCARS, NCANDS, and CFSR.

Documentation of Contact in Trails (Web-Based Training)

This short video will assist caseworkers and supervisors in accurately entering data into Trails and includes a demonstration of what, where, and how to enter data.

Learners who have already completed this WBT can access the training at any time to review it without registering again by selecting Access Online Training from their Profile page, then selecting the course title.

Educational Stability (Web-Based Training)

Child welfare intervention can often bring lots of change for children. Although we may anticipate big changes happening at home, moving to a new school can also critically impact educational outcomes for children and youth. In this Web-based training, you will explore the importance of school stability, laws that guide practice around educational placements, and implementation in Colorado.

Building on your prior child welfare training and practice experience, you will

  • examine the critical role that education plays in positive psychosocial development in children and youth;
  • explore best interest determination meetings—what they are, who participates, and what information is considered, as well as the importance of the child’s or youth’s perspective; and
  • practice implementing the school stability framework using family scenarios so that you can make the best decision possible for every child and youth.

Engaging and Supporting Kinship Families

Child welfare professionals now recognize the importance of maintaining family relationships for children and youth in care. But engaging and supporting diverse kinship families is complex and challenging work.

This day-and-a half workshop is designed to help you build new skills for effectively engaging and supporting kinship families—and for assessing their strengths and challenges—always with the goal of helping more children and youth find stability with familiar and invested family members. You will hear the voices of kinship providers. Experiential activities will give you a deeper understanding of their underlying motivations, strengths, and worries. And together we will build on these opportunities...

  • to develop skills for engaging with kinship families when you first approach them,
  • to hone your skills in assessing the dynamics in kinship families that can make or break a placement
  • ,
  • to learn how to help families make behavioral changes that can promote increased well-being and stability for the children and youth in care, and
  • to practice sound and skillful interventions with families who need extra support and understanding.

Engaging Youth in a Coach-Like Way

This course is being offered exclusively for the Pathways to Success Navigators. If you are not invited to this training as part of this project, you are not eligible to register for this course.

To build an effective working relationship with older youth, it is essential to understand their story and come to appreciate how their story influences their values, perspectives, decisions, identity, and life choices. Earning the right to influence a young person calls for establishing the insight and ability to make a young person feel seen, heard, and understood.

This interactive two-day hybrid course will provide learners with the knowledge, skills, abilities, and insight to effectively engage with older youth in a coach-like way. Upon completion of this course, learners will demonstrate a keen ability to establish meaningful and influential relationships with older youth. Learners will be able to partner with older youth to co-create environments and plans that help young persons generate self-awareness and initiate courageous action to pave the way for success in the future.

Pre-Classroom Required Work
Prior to the classroom training, learners will be required to complete the web-based training (WBT) portion of this course. The web-based training will introduce learners to the Engaging Youth Resource Guide. This guide identifies practice tips, tools, and resources for best serving older youth in their transition to adulthood. It breaks the resources out across five pathways: Permanency, Education, Health & Well-Being, Housing, and Employment. These tools are designed for you to use with the youth on your caseloads toward achieving their goals.

Learners are expected to read this resource guide prior to participation in the classroom training. Following completion of the pre-classroom work, learners will be equipped to meaningfully participate in the skills-based practices within the classroom course.

Enhancing Practice Through Group Supervision

In this one-day course, you’ll develop the skills you need to effectively prepare for and participate in group supervision in your workplace. Case studies, discussions, and practice sessions will equip you to

  • prepare yourself for consultation in group supervision,
  • navigate through the Consultation and Information Sharing Framework to enhance your critical thinking,
  • engage in a rigorous and balanced assessment of your casework practice, and
  • support your peers in critically thinking about their work.

You’ll leave ready to leverage group supervision as a resource for solution building toward the ultimate goal: enhanced engagement practices and outcomes with families

Enhancing Practice with Families Impacted by Substance Use

Assessing for risk and safety when parental substance use is present can be complex and calls for increased comfort in talking with families about their substance use and possible impacts on children. This interactive two-day training, suitable for new caseworkers, experienced caseworkers, and supervisors alike, offers advanced skill building. Teams or units are also invited to attend together. We’ll combine instruction with an emphasis on sharing successes and overcoming challenges through practical experiences and live simulations with professional actors.

You’ll leave armed with additional tools to enhance your safety-building practices and aid in decision making, managing safety, engaging families, identifying protective capacities, and making placement and permanency decisions. Come prepared to be challenged and expect to leave with new insights.

Ethics and Liability: The Big Issues

You entered this field with good intentions: helping children, youth, and families. Here is a one-day course to help you “do it right.” You’ll acquire a basic of understanding of the law through engagement with real case scenarios. The course will also support your day-to-day practice by highlighting risk management, the ethics of social work, and child protection standards.

Facilitators of Change

This course focuses on the skills you’ll need to effectively facilitate informal family meetings—those meetings at which a family, its supports, and a child welfare practitioner discuss the family’s continued involvement with the department to mitigate or eliminate the child protection concern. You’ll hone your ability to engage with families, leveraging skills you acquired in Safety Through Engagement or Engaging With Families (a Fundamentals of Colorado Child Welfare Casework Practice course and a prerequisite for this course). This course will also help you identify

  • personal strengths that can help you authentically engage families,
  • personal challenges to fostering trust and relationship building,
  • strategies for self-management during a meeting, and
  • strategies for becoming a more effective facilitator of change with families.

You’ll leave equipped to guide an informal meeting in a way that fully integrates the values and skills of the Colorado Practice Mod

el.

The FAR Process

The Colorado Differential Response (DR) Model represents an organizational shift in participating child welfare agencies that impacts all parts of the organization, including essential infrastructure changes and a deepened and enhanced set of social work practices.

In this one-day course, you will gain a comprehensive understanding of the Colorado DR Model and will take a deep dive into learning about one of the organizational processes of the model: the dual-track response. Within a dual-track response system, allegations of child maltreatment that have been referred to the department and accepted for assessment can be assessed through a High Risk Assessment or a Family Assessment Response.

This course will engage you in activities that will build your understanding of each step of the Family Assessment Response process. You will have opportunities to discuss, reflect upon, and ask questions about the FAR process to support you in understanding what the implementation of a dual-track response system means for you, your department, your community, and most importantly, the children, youth, and families you serve.

Following this course, you will be prepared to participate in the Partnering With Families in Differential Response course to learn about the social work practices that can be applied within a FAR process.

Fear Less: Protecting Yourself in the Field

Take charge of your own safety!

Have you ever been concerned about your safety when out in the field? Join this hands-on caseworker safety course that builds on the foundations from Worker Safety: Protecting Those Serving Others. In a virtual classroom, you'll explore the legal ramifications of self-defense in your county and review de-escalation techniques. In a private studio space, you'll engage with a certified Krav Maga instructor to learn hands-on self-defense and escape techniques. Build your skills, gain confidence, and walk away from this course ready to handle anything that comes your way on the job. There is no other course like this in the Colorado Child Welfare Training System!

Important disclosure: This course requires you to sign liability waivers in order to register due to the physical demands and subject matter of the course. You are required to find your own agency policy regarding use of self-defense techniques so that you are fully aware of the liability that exists if you choose to use any of the Krav Maga techniques while working. You must attend the two virtual sessions and the studio session in order to receive credit for the course.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (Web-Based Training)

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) affect nearly 30 percent of children and youth in the foster care and adoption system and 15 to 25 percent of those in the juvenile justice system. Do you know how to support children, youth, and families who are impacted by them?

This Web-based training, with customized content for both caseworkers and caregivers, explores the research around the impacts of fetal alcohol exposure and how FASD affects behavior and functioning. You’ll examine what FASD looks like to adults and think about what it feels like to an affected child or youth. Using case scenarios, you’ll explore practical strategies and interventions for supporting these children and youth at home, in school, and in the community.

Whether you’re a caregiver or a caseworker, your involvement with children or youth with FASD will be even more successful when you hone the skills for supporting them in managing their behavior and negotiating their daily life and know how to access community resources and specialized services.

Guided by the Law: ICWA, ASFA, MEPA, ADA (Web-Based Training)

ICWA, ASFA, MEPA, and the ADA? So many acronyms! This web-based training highlights key elements of four key federal laws: the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA), the Multiethnic Placement Act (MEPA), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Through engagement with case scenarios, you will learn how these federal laws affect practice on a day-to- day level.

Building on knowledge gained in the Legal Preparation for Caseworkers class, this course breaks down the key provisions of the laws, addressing potential sanctions for failing to follow them and highlighting potential negative effects of violations on children in care.

Indian Child Welfare Act: Application, Jurisdiction & Best Practices

In this one-day training, you’ll learn about the continuing impact of historic events and intergenerational trauma on Indian children, parents, and families. A legal overview of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) will focus on jurisdiction, notice, active efforts to reunify families, standards of proof, expert witness requirements, and invalidation of actions for ICWA violations. You’ll also explore best practices for achieving permanency and better outcomes for American Indian/Alaska Native children, including tools and resources that aid in ICWA compliance.

Impacts and Implications of Prenatal Substance Exposure

Facilitated by Illuminate Colorado, this interactive one-day classroom course is designed to give you a better understanding of the impacts of prenatal exposure to substances on a fetus, an infant, a child, and an adolescent. You’ll cycle through six stations, gaining knowledge about how different substances specifically affect development, and you’ll categorize nine brain processes and associated behaviors that may be affected by prenatal exposures to understand the impacts on children and youth throughout their lifetime. Through hands-on activities, you will apply your learnings directly to case scenarios to give you opportunities to consider the application to your practice.

Upon completion of this course, you will comprehend the short- and long-term impacts on brain development and functioning, as well the unique challenges associated with maternal substance abuse and the implications for child safety. Additionally, you will be armed with knowledge to identify children and adolescents who have experienced prenatal substance exposure and the confidence to move forward with these cases.

The Invisible Conversation

To build an effective working relationship with a family, it is essential to understand their cultural story. We need to appreciate how that story influences perspectives, decisions, the justification of decisions, and the creation of identities and social values.

How we do that? We start with ourselves.

In this one-day course, you’ll participate in experiential activities designed to cultivate insights related to your own identity and its influence on your practice. From there, you’ll develop insights into the development of cultural identity in the children and families you work with. And you’ll gain comfort in facilitating courageous conversations with families and other child welfare professionals to promote cultural awareness and responsive practice.

This course will encourage you to think critically and evaluate your current practice: how can you better meet the needs of culturally different families while also working to address disproportionate and disparate treatment of culturally different families in the child welfare system? You’ll leave with practical strategies, unique to your own journey, to employ in your work with families.

Leading Organizational Change

Change happens! And virtually no one looks forward to it nor does it typically occur smoothly. This course will offer you valuable information and best practices from research to enrich your leadership of any kind of change. You’ll learn frameworks, models, and perspectives that you can apply immediately. You will employ the Principles of Partnership, the power of parallel process, William Bridge’s model of change, and the Social Styles model of interpersonal effectiveness to enrich your relationships with those you lead.

In this course, you will:

  • participate actively in small groups to experience and discuss parallel process and each of the six Principles of Partnership;
  • engage in group activities that provide insight into your staff’s perspective;
  • explore the differences between change and transition;
  • develop a plan to support staff as they manage transitions and change in the workplace;
  • use a Social Styles Inventory and accompanying information to identify your social style and demonstrate an understanding of the strengths and challenges inherent in your style; and
  • examine the needs of colleagues with social styles different than your own and identify strategies for adapting to meet those needs.

Following this two-day course, you will be empowered as a leader to build, maintain, and enhance partnerships with staff and with external stakeholders. Creating or strengthening these relationships is the key to successfully introducing and managing change in a way that minimizes disruption and enhances resiliency within the organizational culture.

Leading Practice Through Group Supervision

Building on the knowledge you gained in the New Supervisor Pre-Service Training Academy, this one-day interactive training for leaders will provide you with the knowledge, skills, and abilities you need to effectively facilitate group supervision. You will explore the purpose of group supervision as compared with that of individual supervision, the ways in which group supervision benefits families, facilitation strategies for meaningfully engaging caseworkers in consultation, and strategies for managing challenges to the group supervision process. You’ll leave the training prepared to initiate group supervision with your unit or to enhance the group supervision practices you already have in place.

Legalized Marijuana: Considerations for Child Safety (Web-Based Training)

The legalization of marijuana for both medical and recreational use in Colorado has brought with it many questions about its impact on children and families. In this interactive learning experience, learners will explore to what extent marijuana use or cultivation may affect child safety. This web-based training provides

  • an overview of Colorado’s marijuana laws,
  • an introduction to marijuana and its effects on the body and behavior, and
  • a summary of existing research on the impacts on infants, children, teens, and adults.

This WBT is a prerequisite for the Marijuana, Children, and Families classroom course, which explores in more depth the child welfare considerations and best practices related to marijuana.

Mandatory Reporter Training

This Web-based training is for individuals who are required by law to make reports of child abuse or neglect. After taking this course, you’ll be able to do the following:

  • recognize which professions are considered mandatory reporters in Colorado
  • appreciate how a Colorado mandatory reporter is uniquely positioned to report suspected maltreatment
  • identify the indicators and behaviors associated with abuse and neglect, even when they are subtle or nonverbal, including the variety of ways a child may inform a mandatory reporter that they are being abused or neglected
  • understand the legal obligations of a Colorado mandatory reporter, such as when and how to report suspected or known abuse or neglect and the legal consequences for not reporting
  • recognize the information a Colorado mandatory reporter will likely be asked when reporting suspected or known abuse or neglect to child protective services or law enforcement
  • identify groups of children and youth who may be at a higher risk for abuse or neglect and understand what it means to be a vulnerable child
  • demonstrate, when a child discloses information, the ability to interact with a child using language that is simple, supportive, objective, and not probative
  • distinguish the types of abuse and neglect that occur most frequently and identify signs of trauma
  • exhibit a working understanding of the difference between reporting and investigating and appreciate the consequences associated with interviewing the child or conducting an investigation before making a report

If you are an educator, first responder, healthcare provider, or mental health professional, you’ll take the training module identified specifically for your profession. All other mandatory reporters should take either the training for professionals in another field or the training for volunteers who work with children or youth.

Meeting Matters: Making the Most of Facilitated Family Meetings

Family engagement meetings (FEMs) are more than a task to check off of the list, more than a tool to pull off the shelf as an option when trouble is brewing. FEMs are a way of life for child welfare practice—a values-driven practice inherent in supporting and guiding families to coalesce around their children and partner with the agency in establishing a plan for safety, permanency, and well-being of children and youth.

This learning experience takes you above the technical nature of facilitating FEMs and grounds you in what it means to be a facilitator of a family meeting. Being a facilitator is about how YOU show up as a facilitator—appreciative, honoring, hopeful, encouraging, and supportive or something else? You’ll get grounded in your why: Why has the role of a facilitator chosen you? Then you’ll begin to assess how you are able to carry out the twelve elements outlined in the FEM Quality Meeting Assessment Tool (e.g., safety focused, behavioral changes, family strengths, family voice).

Over the course of the learning experience, you will

  • engage in an interactive meta skills process that will allow you, as a facilitator, to shape the meeting space, with intention, to produce the desired outcomes;
  • take part in a deep democracy process that will foster a more thorough understanding and a greater awareness of the roles and varied perspectives of FEM constituency groups, thereby establishing the ground conditions for more purposeful facilitation; and
  • participate in a simulated FEM to try out your newly developed skills and increased awareness and develop an Individualized Quality Meeting Assessment Plan.

And you’ll leave with a renewed purpose in facilitating family meetings.

This learning experience is highly interactive. It is not lecture based, as you will be the source of new discoveries and learnings that help you engage in the being of facilitation.

Motivating Positive Outcomes With Adolescents

This one-day training expands on the basic content discussed in The Adolescent 411. We all acknowledge that adolescents can be challenging, even on the best of days. The goal of this training is to help you promote positive outcomes by increasing your understanding why an adolescent is “behaving” in a specific way and how you can effectively work with adolescents, their families, and their community. Upon completion, you will be prepared to

  • build rapport with resistant adolescents;
  • understand the purpose behind problematic behaviors;
  • develop skills to effectively intervene with adolescents; and,
  • identify barriers to permanency so that you can engage teens in permanency planning.

Nurturing Professionals in a Challenging Environment

This one-day classroom course is designed to give you the tools you need to protect, nurture, and support child welfare’s most valuable resource, its workers. You will learn how to build upon Solution-Focused Practice principles to empower workers while motivating them to effectively complete required work tasks, and you’ll gain the skills you need to build upon workers’ capacity for compassion and empathy and their drive to make a difference in the lives of children and families. Ways of discussing challenging cases that focus on possibility and success will be explored, as will tools for preventing worker burnout.

Upon completion, you will

  • understand the unique aspects of solution-focused thinking and be able to differentiate this model from problem-focused models,
  • understand how to staff a case using a solution-focused framework;
  • understand the key factors needed in building a resilient workforce; and
  • be able to identify three tools you can use immediately with workers.

The Nuts and Bolts of Provider Certification

With best-practice and Volume 7 Rules and Regulations constantly changing, it can be hard to know exactly what is required of you to be successful. Whether you are new to working with certified foster care and kinship care providers or are an old hand, this interactive two-day course is for you. Upon completion, you will

  • know strategies for successful recruitment,
  • know what is needed to fully certify a provider,
  • understand how best practice supports the retention of providers,
  • have a great understanding of Volume 7 Rules and Regulations as they pertain to your position, and
  • have more confidence and knowledge—and less stress—as you continue doing a great job!

Partnering for Safety 12-Module Series

Partnering for Safety is a twelve-part modular series designed by the Children’s Research Center in collaboration with the Colorado Department of Human Services and various Colorado counties. The modules take learners through a series of family participatory and solution-focused practice skills, with links to the Consultation and Information Sharing Framework (Lohrbach, 2000), Differential Response, and other recent child welfare practice innovations.

The Partnering for Safety modules are designed to allow time in between modules for learners to practice in the field with support from a supervisor, coach, or peer leader. Each module is approximately three hours in length and delivered in small-group settings.

The overall series is designed to have relevance to all employees within a child welfare organization—caseworkers, supervisors, and managers—and across program areas (intake/assessment, ongoing/permanency, PA-4, etc.).

In Module 1, Interviewing for Safety and Danger: What Is a Balanced, Rigorous Assessment?learners will explore the following:

  • Overview of family engagement and solution-focused interviewing
  • Definition of safety: What does it mean to have a safety-organized practice?
  • Example of a balanced, rigorous assessment
  • Distinguishing between harm, danger, safety, and strengths
  • Values and principles in this approach


In Module 2, Three Questions, learners will explore the following:

  • Using the Three Questions to guide practice: What are we worried about? What’s working well? What needs to happen?
  • Deepening inquiry around the first two questions
  • Exploring the impact on children
  • Avoiding generalizations
  • Exploring the third question (What needs to happen?) by identifying small steps toward change


In Module 3, Interviewing Children, learners will explore the following:

  • Purpose of interviewing children
  • Ways of engaging children and youth
  • Use of the Three Houses tool—how and when to use it
  • Use of the Safety House tool—how and when to use it

In Module 4, Solution-Focused Inquiry, learners will explore the following:

  • What is solution-focused inquiry?
  • Why is solution-focused inquiry valuable to use with families?
  • What specific solution-focused questions (exceptions, scaling, coping, preferred future, and position questions) can be used with families?
  • How to use solution-focused questions in practice (e.g., in a first contact with a family, in assessment, in ongoing/permanency, when developing case plans)

In Module 5, (Re)-Introducing the Consultation and Information Sharing Framework: Part One, learners will explore the following:

  • Definitions in the framework
  • Purposes for using the framework in practice
  • Questions that facilitate the framework

In Module 6, Risk and Goal Statements, learners will explore the following:

  • Description of a risk statement and examples of risk statements in practice
  • Description of a goal statement and examples of goal statements in practice
  • Approaches for eliciting input from families to craft risk and goal statements
  • Ways of using these statements when working with families

In Module 7, The Consultation and Information Sharing Framework: Part Two: Use With the Family, learners will explore the following:

  • Taking the framework into home visits for use with families
  • Using the three-column map with families
  • Connecting the framework and solution-focused questions

In Module 8, Network Development, learners will explore the following:

  • Purposes of exploring and identifying members of a family’s network
  • Ways to engage and utilize the family’s network in supporting and planning with families
  • Strategies for identifying network members
  • Techniques for developing safety and support circles with a family

In Module 9, Planning, learners will explore the following:

  • The difference between insight and action
  • Safety planning and support planning
  • Critical elements needed in all plans
  • Involvement of the family’s network in planning

In Module 10, Landing These Ideas in Everyday Work: Part One, learners will explore the following:

  • Integration of Partnering for Safety in RED teams
  • Integration of Partnering for Safety in group supervision
  • Integration of Partnering for Safety in the facilitation of family meetings

In Module 11, Landing These Ideas in Everyday Work: Part Two, learners will explore the following:

  • Integration of Partnering for Safety in visitation and parenting time
  • Use of Partnering for Safety to inform/support reunification
  • Use of Partnering for Safety to achieve permanency

In Module 12, Conclusion, learners will explore the following:

  • A look back and review of all of the Partnering for Safety modules
  • A look at what social work practitioners have done with Partnering for Safety
  • A celebration of accomplishments and plan for the future

Partnering With Families in Differential Response

The Colorado Differential Response (DR) Model represents an organizational shift in participating child welfare agencies that impacts all parts of the organization, including essential infrastructure changes and a deepened and enhanced set of social work practices.

In this two-day course, you will embark on a journey through the seven enhanced social work practices of the Colorado DR Model:

  • A rigorous and balanced assessment;
  • Strategies for including children and youth;
  • The Consultation and Information Sharing Framework;
  • Evidence-based assessment tools;
  • Risk and goal statements;
  • Participation of extended networks; and
  • Behaviorally-based safety and support plans.

You will explore and practice how to apply these practices to building authentic partnerships with families in order to achieve the goals of safety, permanency, and well-being. You are encouraged to share stories and experiences with each of these practices throughout the training to enhance the practice of all learners.

Following this course, you will have the knowledge and skills necessary to engage families in a DR system and will have engaged in critical thinking to recognize how the social work practices in the DR model will enhance your current work with children, youth, and families.

Partnering With Families to Overcome Challenges

This two-day classroom course is designed to help you enhance your Solution-Focused Practice skills and gain a deeper understanding of a family’s perspective. You’ll build on the foundations you learned in other classes to hone your skills to carefully match the solution-focused questions that work best for each family, that will enhance engagement, and that will create greater fulfillment for you and for them. We’ll explore the ways in which this approach is uniquely different from other models, and you’ll learn to use the six Solution-Focused interventions to boost your child welfare practices. This course is specifically designed to ensure you leave the classroom ready to effectively implement these skills with families.

Upon completion, you will

  • have hands-on tools for immediate use when you find yourself challenged to engage with the most difficult families,
  • understand how and why each type of intervention works,
  • be able to adapt your language and questions to meet your families where they’re at, and
  • know how to ensure that these tools are a genuine and a good fit with your personal style.

Permanency Roundtable Skills

This experiential course will provide you with the skills you need to effectively participate in Permanency Roundtables. You’ll have the opportunity to practice these skills and to engage in a mock Permanency Roundtable. Upon completion, you will

  • understand the goals, values, and roles of the Permanency Roundtable case consultation process;
  • appreciate the objectives of each of the six phases of the Permanency Roundtable case consultation process;
  • know how to use the forms related to the Permanency Roundtable case consultation process; and
  • be able to demonstrate the skills involved in a successful Permanency Roundtable session, including appreciative listening, asking nonblaming questions, and clarifying participants’ operating agreements.

Power Outages: Behavioral Interventions to Avoid Power Struggles

In this one-day classroom course, you will consider the principals of partnering and explore various techniques that support engaging with families—with a focus on adolescents—in a manner that avoids power struggles and conflict. Activities throughout the course will call on you to incorporate the concepts, to identify areas for your own growth, and to practice intervention strategies.

Protecting Professional Resiliency

In this one-day classroom course, we will turn Solution-Focused Practice inward. The work you do is vital, and without intervention, it can have a negative impact on you. Applying solution-focused tools and skills to ourselves protects professional resiliency and can reverse burnout. You will learn to identify the signs of professional burnout and the symptoms of trauma-informed stress, and you will develop and learn to use an “emergency roadside repair kit” to keep yourself invigorated and engaged. Together we will identify protective factors and learn to utilize solution-focused thinking to decrease stress and enhance satisfaction in the work place.

As a result of taking this class you will

  • recognize your unique signs of stress and professional burnout,
  • develop and personalize a list of tools and resources to have on hand to deal with challenging situations,
  • understand the role of the “emergency roadside repair kit” in protecting your professional resiliency, and
  • >have the ability to use the “emergency roadside repair kit” to protect your professional resiliency.

Psychological Assessments in Child Welfare (Web-Based Training)

This self-guided, interactive course will enhance your understanding of psychological assessments as they are used within child welfare. Specifically, you’ll learn about

  • the differences between psychological screenings, assessments, and evaluations;
  • the function of the psychological assessment in case planning;
  • when an assessment should be requested;
  • the distinction between the role of the caseworker and the role of the psychologist in a psychological assessment; and
  • some types of psychological assessments that may be helpful when working with families involved with child welfare.

The Reasonable and Prudent Parent Standard (Web-Based Training)

On a daily basis, parents and caregivers are faced with decisions regarding their children’s safety, permanency, and well-being. These decisions require the use of judgment. The task is complicated for caregivers of children and youth in foster care given the number of laws, policies, guidelines, and rules that restrict activities and require potentially time-consuming approval processes.

Because most children or youth in foster care will likely struggle to experience a “normal” childhood or adolescence, the Reasonable and Prudent Parent Standard was enacted to create more normalcy for them. This self-paced web-based training will help you

  • understand the Reasonable and Prudent Parent Standard (RPPS) as it is outlined in federal law and in Volume 7 (Social Services Rules);
  • consider how to work effectively with those involved in the care of children and youth in out-of-home placement to operationalize the Reasonable and Prudent Parent Standard in decisions that are made for children in out-of-home placements; and
  • reflect on how to interact with children and youth in a culturally responsive and supportive way to promote their healthy development and enhance their well-being.

If you will be a foster or out-of-home caregiver or provider in Colorado, you must obtain initial training in the Reasonable and Prudent Parent Standard through this web-based training. You are then required to receive training annually from your certifying, sponsoring, or owning organization in applying the RPPS.

If you are a caseworker working with children and youth in out-of-home care, this training is also targeted to you. It is designed to enhance your understanding of the RPPS and help you understand how you can support caregivers or providers in operationalizing it.

Recognizing and Responding to Sex Trafficking (Web-Based Training)

Sex trafficking is on the rise in the United States, and you—the child welfare workforce—are uniquely positioned to recognize and respond to children and youth who might be experiencing trafficking. This self-guided Web-based training will increase your awareness of indicators of sex trafficking, highlight risk factors that statistically make a child or youth more vulnerable to traffickers, and empower you to respond with sensitivity to disclosures.

Over the course of this interactive learning experience, you’ll

  • grow your understanding of the prevalence of sex trafficking in Colorado,
  • disentangle sex trafficking terms and definitions from other types of trafficking,
  • explore the backdrop for the reality of sex trafficking and the vulnerability of children and youth in a digital age, and
  • heighten your awareness of methods and places traffickers use to recruit children and youth.

And you’ll be able to immediately integrate the strategies for responding to suspicions of sex trafficking into your everyday practice and apply these techniques to conducting thorough assessments of safety and risk for children and youth.

This course is a prerequisite for Screening for Sex Trafficking: Using the Trails Modernization Tools.

Roadmap to Success as Engagement

In this interactive training, learners focus on engaging youth in the completion of an assessment that is used to develop the Roadmap to Success (formerly Independent Living Plan) and Emancipation Transition Plan, ultimately serving as a roadmap to the youth's identified hopes and dreams.

This classroom session begins with an activity, so it is essential that learners arrive on time. Learners will explore what is required (rule), consider why the rule exists, and enhance strategies around how to engage youth. The training concludes with a Transfer of Learning activity, based upon learner needs.

Safe and Together: Introduction to the Model (Web-Based Training)

This course provides an introduction to the internationally-recognized Safe and Together™ Model. The Model is a set of concepts, tools, and practices to improve how agencies, communities, and individuals respond to domestic violence when children are involved.

After this training, you'll be better able to

  • describe the principles and critical components of the Safe and Together™ Model,
  • describe key concepts of the Model,
  • describe ways in which the Model can change your practice, and
  • demonstrate how to apply the approach to child welfare cases.
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Safe and Together: Multiple Pathways to Harm (Web-Based Training)

This course dives deeper into the internationally-recognized Safe and Together™ Model. The Model is a set of concepts, tools, and practices to improve how agencies, communities, and individuals respond to domestic violence when children are involved.

The assessment and critical-thinking framework introduced in this course will help you to

  • apply a comprehensive assessment lens to the impact of domestic violence perpetrators' behaviors,
  • have high standards for men as parents,
  • engage men from diverse backgrounds,
  • partner with adult survivors, and
  • understand how adult survivors promote their children's safety and well-being.

Safe and Together: Working With Men as Parents (Web-Based Training)

This course dives deeper into the internationally recognized Safe & Together™ Model. The model is a set of concepts, tools, and practices to improve how agencies, communities, and individuals respond to domestic violence when children are involved.

This interactive learning experience introduces a father-inclusive approach to working with children and families. When coupled with a domestic violence–informed framework, this approach will help you

  • identify key aspects of male parental development that impact a father's choices and behaviors,
  • describe how father-inclusive work can benefit women and children,
  • engage men from diverse backgrounds to develop meaningful child- and family-focused interventions,
  • implement these interventions, especially when fathers are domestic violence perpetrators, and
  • build a toolkit of specific tips for engaging men as parents at the prevention and early intervention stages.

SAFE for Administrators

This one-day classroom training, provided by the Consortium for Children (CFC), utilizes a curriculum developed by CFC and is facilitated by SAFE Certified Trainers.

Upon completion, you will

  • understand how the SAFE Home Study is used,
  • appreciate the importance of SAFE Home Studies to maintaining the safety of children; and
  • know how to monitor SAFE Home Studies.

SAFE - Improving Your Skills

This one-day course builds on the foundation established for learners in SAFE Training and strengthens consistent protocol, practice, and clinical supervision for home study evaluators and their supervisors. Learners will review and clarify the SAFE Home Study process, including desk guide ratings, mitigation and mitigation evidence, how to narrate the Psychosocial Evaluation, the importance of supervision in the home study process, and available SAFE articles and tools. Additionally, home study evaluators and supervisors will have the opportunity to discuss their specific SAFE questions.

SAFE Refresher Training

This one-day training, provided by the Consortium for Children (CFC), utilizes a curriculum developed by CFC and is facilitated by SAFE Certified Trainers.

Upon completion you will

  • understand how the SAFE Home Study is used and
  • appreciate the importance of SAFE Home Studies in maintaining the safety of children.

SAFE Supervisor Training

This one-day classroom training, provided by the Consortium for Children (CFC), utilizes a curriculum developed by CFC and is facilitated by SAFE Certified Trainers. This course is specifically for learners who supervise SAFE through best-practice supervision methods. It emphasizes effective ways to supervise SAFE and emphasize the importance of supervision in the Home Study Process.

Upon completion, you will

  • know how to supervise SAFE Home Studies most effectively and
  • understand how important supervision is to the home study process.

SAFE Training

This two-classroom day training, provided by the Consortium for Children (CFC), utilizes a curriculum developed by CFC and is facilitated by SAFE Certified Trainers. You will be trained as a Home Study Practitioner in the use of Structured Analysis Family Evaluation.

Upon completion, you will

  • understand how the SAFE Home Study is used;
  • appreciate how important this work is to maintaining the safety of children; and
  • be able to perform SAFE Home Studies.

Safe Sleep: Creating Safe Sleep Environments for Infants (Web-Based Training)

In this interactive web-based training, you will learn about creating safe sleeping environments for infants. You’ll explore customs and myths related to infant sleep along with recommended approaches and interventions associated with reductions in the risk of sleep-related infant deaths. When you finish this training, you will be able to

  • describe the prevalence of infant death associated with the sleep environment;
  • explain the sleep-related risks for infants, including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID); and
  • summarize the recommendations for the American Academy of Pediatrics for reducing the risk of sleep-related infant deaths.

The additional section created specifically for caseworkers will prepare you to

  • explain the role of the caseworker in educating families about safe-sleep practices;
  • describe the type of information a caseworker might need to discuss or share with families when assessing safe-sleep practices; and
  • describe how best to support families in creating safe sleep environments for their infants.

This enhanced knowledge and these skills will equip you to thoroughly assess whether infants’ sleep environments are safe and to have crucial, culturally responsive conversations with families about this important aspect of caregiving.

Screening for Sex Trafficking: Using the Trails Modernization Tools (Web-Based Training)

Once you have completed the online course Recognizing and Identifying Human Trafficking as a prerequisite, this interactive, self-guided online training will introduce you to the Colorado High Risk Victim Identification Tool. This tool is designed to help caseworkers and supervisors assess whether a child or youth they are working with might be a victim of sex trafficking. Through this online training, you will gain an understanding of

  • how the tool was developed,
  • why the tool is useful for caseworkers,
  • what risk factors are assessed in the tool,
  • when to use the tool in practice,
  • how to complete the tool, and
  • service considerations once the tool has been completed.

After you complete the WBT module, you’ll review four additional video modules. These short videos show you how to document your findings in Trails and cover updates to the human trafficking user interface and changes to how the human trafficking window in Trails is accessed. Through these microburst videos, you will learn the following:

  • How to manage a Screenings record
  • How to add, edit, and submit a Self-Report
  • How to add, edit, and submit Credible Reports
  • How to generate the reports for Human Trafficking — Self Reports and Credible Reports

You will leave this learning experience equipped to complete the tool on your own assessment or case, to explore the results with your supervisor, and to document your findings.

Setting the Foundation: LGBTQ Competency for Child Welfare Professionals

This critical session in the All Children—All Families training series equips child welfare professionals with a comprehensive foundation of knowledge on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals and their experiences within the child welfare system. Participants will learn key concepts and terminology related to sexual orientation and gender identity and expression (SOGIE). Research findings on LGBTQ-headed families—including demographics and outcomes for children raised by LGBTQ parents—and the prevalence and experiences of LGBTQ youth in foster care will be explored. The session concludes by outlining the steps every child welfare professional can take to welcome and affirm LGBTQ youth and parents within the walls of their agencies and beyond.

Sexual Health Fluency: Communicating With Youth and Caregivers About Risks and Resources

Sexual health is essential for all people, yet it can be uncomfortable to discuss, surrounded by cultural, personal, and religious taboos. For youth involved in child welfare services—who experience disproportionate rates of sexual health issues compared to other teens, in addition to a mountain of other challenges—the need to learn about sexual health is even more critical, and it’s imperative that we overcome our own discomfort around these conversations.

Youth in care not only experience trauma, which can impact their sexual development, but they also all too often miss out on traditional sexual health education that other students get in school and from their families. This course will empower learners to facilitate trauma-informed discussions around healthy sexual development with both youth and caregivers.

In this training, learners will

  • consider their own values around sexual health and the importance of respecting others’ values,
  • explore sexual health needs and risks related to youth involved in foster care,
  • investigate local and online sexual health resources and services available to youth, and
  • practice talking with confidence about sexual health with youth and caregivers through a trauma-informed lens.

Sleep Tight, the Kids Are All Right: Supervisory Practice to Prevent Serious Harm

The worst possible news a supervisor can get is that a child who they are working tirelessly to protect has died, nearly died, or been seriously hurt. Questions abound: “Did I do...?” “What didn’t I do?” and “If only I’d known about...” Caseworkers and supervisors in child protection talk about many sleepless nights spent worrying while also hoping that the decisions made will best serve the child and prevent the worst possible outcome. Unfortunately, there is no magic formula that will prevent these tragedies 100 percent of the time; however, we know that there are certain steps that can be taken to mitigate them.

Sleep Tight, the Kids Are All Right is a comprehensive hybrid course designed to provide a safe space for supervisors to acknowledge their fears, explore their struggles, and learn about and adopt strategies that can bring some knowing into the vacuum of the unknown.

This learning experience begins with two Web-based trainings and is followed by a two-day classroom session. During the WBTs, learners will prepare for real-time case-based practice in the classroom by exploring data and the fundamentals of the social ecological model, and they’ll examine the key aspects of secondary and tertiary stress in the workplace. In the classroom, learners will engage in meaningful guided discussions, reflecting on their years of experience in supervisory practice and sharing their wisdom. Small and large group consultation practice will call learners to think critically about the importance of thorough assessments that produce robust safety and support plans that can mitigate risk for children.

Through this learning experience, learners will be able to do the following:

  • Recognize their value as a crucial resource to caseworkers handling the complex work of child protection
  • Use the social ecological model and specific tools introduced in the classroom to capture critical information and use supervisory strategies to help prevent future abuse and neglect
  • Describe and use focused and strengths-based inquiry as well as clinical questions to promote critical thinking that can be applied in the assessment and case planning processes

Please note: The two WBTs need to be completed before attending the classroom session.

SMART Family Services Planning

What part of case planning challenges you? Whether you are new to writing Family Services Plans or have years of experience, this one-day course will build on your current skills and strengthen your ability to write clear, measurable, and culturally responsive plans.

Bring a copy of one of your own past or present Family Services Plans with the family name blacked out. Together, in a safe, solution-focused environment, we’ll share a variety of case examples and refine our ability to

  • develop SMART objectives that reflect a change in behavior,
  • scaffold action steps for success, and
  • devise strategies that measure success to ensure that behavior change is occurring and that the areas of current or impending danger and/or risk factors that initiated the Family Services Plan are being addressed
  • .

Creation of a Family Services Plan, commonly referred to as a “road map” for families, can encounter obstacles. As we develop SMART plans to address areas of current or impending danger and/or risk factors, we will anticipate barriers families may face and identify strategies to support them in achieving success.

You’ll leave with increased confidence in your ability to formulate, deliver, and measure your current and future Family Service Plans.

Solution-Focused Supervision

This one day hands-on course will expand your thinking about the use of Solution-Focused Practice. While, these practices are traditionally used with families, they are equally powerful in motivating staff and leading others. You’ll learn and practice methods of effectively addressing challenging workplace behaviors in a solution-focused way. Basic agency culture and the creation of organizational safety will be reviewed, and you’ll get tips for encouraging staff success.

You’ll leave with

  • an understanding of why solution-focused principles are so effective with people (including other professionals);
  • at least five concrete tools that you can immediately begin to use with your colleagues; and
  • concrete examples for immediate application.

The Substance Use Puzzle: Putting Together the Pieces (Web-Based Training)

Issues of substance use and abuse within families can be a complex puzzle. Its various pieces—a family’s struggles, needs, strengths, and supports—cohere to form a unique picture of the impact of substance use on parental functioning and parenting capacity. Through this interactive learning experience, learners will better understand all of the pieces of this puzzle and how they fit together. Learners will gain insight into the different substances of use/abuse and their effects, the role of drug testing, the science of addiction, and substance use disorder treatment. And they’ll explore how all of these connect to reveal the impact of substance use on children and families.

This WBT is a prerequisite for the two classroom courses Building Safety When Parents Use Substances and Enhancing Practice With Families Impacted by Substance Use.

Supervising to Permanency

Permanency is the outcome that we are all striving for! All supervisors from all areas of child welfare contribute to permanency. In this one-day course, you’ll discover a dynamic and hands-on method of supervising to permanency with the STOP (Support, Timeliness, Opportunities, and Problem-Solving) tool. You’ll explore and practice the use of the STOP tool to promote critical thinking and collaboration in the interest of permanency. Plan on a dynamic environment of learning, practicing, and creating!

Supporting Families When Children and Youth Display Problematic Sexual Behaviors

When children or youth engage in problematic sexual behavior, developing a plan to support the child and family can be complicated. In this course, learners will gain an understanding of what constitutes problematic sexual behavior, how to recognize it, and how to support families before and after adjudication.

Facilitated by Illuminate Colorado, this interactive one-day classroom course will explore complex situations to safely analyze common concepts and practices, including 24/7 line of sight, informed supervision, and working within a treatment team.

Note: This course will focus on problematic sexual behavior displayed by children or youth. If you are looking for a course on the impact of child sexual abuse on both the child victim and the non-offending parent, you might be better served by the course Considerations for Engaging the Non-Offending Parent.

Supporting Youth in Achieving Permanency

How can you best help adolescents in your home plan for permanency and a successful transition to adulthood? What types of engagement have worked best for youth at this developmental stage? This area of care can be extremely difficult to navigate. So it’s important to be informed and able to advocate for the kids in your home.

This day-and-a-half training will provide a facilitated discussion among foster parents with various levels of experience in this arena. You’ll also acquire

  • new skills for engaging youth in their permanency planning and transition to adulthood,
  • new perspectives on how culture and identity affect different youths’ experiences in this area, and
  • current information on services available to youth making this transition.

Come share what you know and learn from others.

There's an APP for That! Family Reunification

This one-day training will sharpen your skills in supporting reunification for children, youth, and their families. Come apply your Colorado Practice Model skills to a real-life case scenario! You’ll spend the day practicing and refining those skills so that you can better assess, plan, and partner with and support families on their road to reunification.

Participating will get you the following APPS:

  • Assessing Readiness for Reunification,
  • Planning to Promote and Maintain Reunification,
  • Partnering With Support Systems, and
  • Supporting Families During and After the Reunification Process.

Training Facilitation Skills Institute 101

Whether you are an experienced training facilitator or have never trained a group before, this live, one-day learning lab will enhance your ability to facilitate a room full of learners in an engaging, energizing, and purposeful way. Group-based activities will mirror a training day—from opening activities to closing the day. Each activity will model adult-learning strategies, and you’ll reflect on old designs and new methodologies that keep learners engaged, motivated, and connected to the material being delivered.

Since the emphasis will be on experiential, hands-on learning, you will be encouraged share your knowledge of and experience in facilitating people, process, and content. Along the way, you’ll accumulate strategies and techniques for

  • meeting the needs of varied adult learners and adult learning styles,
  • encouraging and supporting participatory learning,
  • promoting the use of powerful questions and critical thinking in a classroom environment, and
  • increasing your knowledge and skills related to classroom management.

You’ll leave with new ideas and increased comfort in facilitating the learning of others.

Training Facilitation Skills Institute 201

Learning the craft of dynamic delivery means that, as a facilitator, you fully engage; you inspire learning by using cutting-edge techniques and by making full use of self. In this workshop, you will hone your craft by self-assessing your learning and facilitator styles, understanding how curriculum guides the learning experience, practicing platform delivery skills, differentiating between types of facilitation and learning, strategizing on ways to address challenging learner behaviors, integrating Continuous Quality Improvement into your facilitation approach, and applying what you have learned in a dynamic delivery practice session.

We will create a learning environment where we will draw upon our collective knowledge to resolve issues common to learning experiences. Building upon your knowledge and skills as both a learner and facilitator of learning events, we will engage you in a variety of practice-based activities modeling effective facilitation.

You will have the opportunity to connect with a performance acting coach for a customized learning experience and also practice your facilitation skills with peers in a safe environment to try out the knowledge and skills learned in the Institute. The Institute will immediately elevate your facilitation skills and improve your confidence for engaging learners and maximizing the learning environment.

WBT Content will be available for Access 10 business days prior to the first day of the classroom portion of training.

Trauma-Informed Practice for Case Aides

Are you a case aide who works directly with clients? This two-day training is the first in a series of three trainings designed specifically for you. You’ll participate in a wide array of activities, and you’ll learn the core skills you need in order to make child welfare interventions with children and families.

Specifically, you will learn how to

  • engage clients (by establishing rapport through listening, reflection, clarification);
  • assess and defuse hostile/angry clients;
  • avoid power struggles and develop strategies to disengage once you are in a power struggle; and
  • apply these skills in visitation practices and services.

You’ll leave with practical, culturally appropriate intervention techniques that you can use immediately with clients.

Understanding Adolescent Development and Trauma Impacts for Multisystem-Involved Youth (Web-Based Training)

This interactive, self-guided online course is designed to help professionals serving juveniles involved in the justice system understand the impact of trauma on the development of adolescents. This course is a prerequisite for the ECHO series They Belong to Us All: Benefiting Youth Through System Collaboration.

Your own experiences in working with youth will be a resource during this Web-based training. You’ll view videos that provide examples of typical and atypical development, engage in interactive activities, and access written resources to explore the impact of trauma on adolescent development. Throughout the course, you will be asked to consider the impact that trauma might have on the youth you are caring for and working with and how this impact might manifest in a youth’s development or behavior.

In this training you will explore four developmental domains:

  • Physical
  • Cognitive
  • Social-emotional
  • Sexual

Within each domain, you’ll explore the following topics:

  • Typical developmental milestones for adolescents
  • Indicators that development has been affected or disrupted by trauma
  • Guidelines for what a multidisciplinary team can do when developmental concerns have been identified
  • How to identify atypical development
  • How best to support adolescents affected by trauma

Understanding the Role of the GAL

Both caseworkers and guardians ad litem work to advance the best interests of children; yet at times it seems these two roles are miles apart. This one-day, problem-based classroom course brings caseworkers and guardians ad litem together to find solutions that are in the best interests of children. You’ll explore the roles that attorneys and caseworkers play in a dependency and neglect action, analyze case scenarios from different perspectives, and understand how to collaborate within an adversarial system. Through engagement with real case scenarios, you will also practice strategies for negotiation when reasonable minds disagree about what is truly best for a child.

Case work is tough. Attorneys don’t always make it easier. This course will equip you with the tools and resources you need to work with child welfare partners and improve outcomes for children.

Worker Safety: Protecting Those Serving Others

Casework can be unpredictable and sometimes dangerous. As a caseworker, you focus on promoting the safety, permanency, and well-being of the children and youth you serve. But to do so effectively, you must also prioritize your own safety and well-being. The goal of this one-day classroom course is to arm you with strategies and critical-thinking skills that will help you stay safe in the field.

Through engagement with real case scenarios, you will draw on your own experiences to examine what makes a situation unsafe and what can be done to preserve personal safety. Specific areas of exploration will include

  • personal and environmental safety,
  • preparing for safety before a visit,
  • maintaining safety during a visit, and
  • creating a personal safety plan. 

Working With REAL Families

This two-day, hands-on training is the second in a series of three trainings for case aides. Through participation in the classroom activities, you’ll develop advanced skills for working with diverse families and their children.

Upon completion, you will

  • have developed the process and skills associated with helping relationships;
  • know how to effectively supervise parenting time with difficult populations; and
  • have acquired skills that can be used with families in their homes, as well as in parenting centers.

Youth-Centered Permanency Roundtables

A Youth-Centered Permanency Roundtable (PRT), also called a Youth Voice Roundtable, allows each youth’s voice to be heard in developing a promising pathway to permanency and a lifetime of connectedness. The purpose of the Youth-Centered PRT training is to help all team members understand how important it is to help youth play an active role in their own planning. You will learn to

  • engage with youth in planning for his or her own permanency;
  • talk with a youth about expedited legal permanency;
  • talk with a youth about increasing his or her permanent positive connections;
  • work in conjunction with a youth to finalize a workable permanency action plan that addresses permanency, education, and physical and mental health;
  • ensure that a youth feels understood, appreciated, and hopeful;
  • prepare a youth for participation in the transition phase 2 roundtable; and
  • discuss options, action plan, and resources available to a youth in a way that is easily understood.